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Jeff Bezos recovers Apollo-era rocket engines from the ocean floor
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Multiple millionaire  Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon and the Blue Origin aerospace company, has successfully recovered some of the massive F-1 engines from Apollo era Saturn V rocket debris on the ocean floor.

Last month saw the recovery of “enough parts for 2 F-1 engines” recovered by an expedition led and financed by Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon and Blue Origin from the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of more than 2.65 miles.

Five F-1 engines powered the first stage of the Saturn V rocket used on the Apollo missions of the sixties and seventies, taking the first astronauts to the moon. Each F-1 produced nearly 70 metric tonnes of thrust and to date is the largest and most powerful single-combustion-chamber rocket ever made.

Unfortunately the parts recovered haven’t revealed any parts numbers yet, which makes identifying the specific mission impossible. They will be restored to stabilise their condition now that they have been removed from the salty water of the ocean, but Bezos is on record as saying that he wants the recovered engines to tell their own story in keeping the damage theyve sustained from half a century on the ocean floor as well as their incandescent re-entry. It is hoped that some part numbers will be revealed during this restoration.

You can see more images of the recovered engines from Bezos’ expedition here.

Image: An F-1’s thrust chamber is winched onto the deck of Bezos’ expedition ship. Credit: Blue Origin/Bezos’ Expedition

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About The Author
AstroAggregator
My name's Chris Pounds. I started Astronomy Aggregator in 2012 as a hobby site for my interests in spaceflight and astronomy. I'm finishing up an MSc. in Aerospace Engineering. My undergraduate degree was in Mechanical Engineering with a final year dissertation focussed on performance characteristics of aerospike rocket nozzles.
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