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F-1 recovered from sea bed confirmed to be Apollo 11 engine
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Further to the recovery of an F-1 engine by an expedition funded by Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and CEO of spaceflight corporation Blue Origin; Bezos Expeditions has revealed conclusive proof that one of the engines they recovered from the sea floor is an engine from the Apollo 11 mission.

In March this year, Bezos Expeditions raised “enough parts for 2 F-1 engines” from more than two miles below the ocean surface off the east Florida coast. Since then a team of conservators have been at work on the corroded parts, looking for any kind of markings to identify the engines and the mission they came from.

Posted two days ago on the Bezos Expeditions website, Jeff had this to say:

[quote]Today, I’m thrilled to share some exciting news. One of the conservators who was scanning the objects with a black light and a special lens filter has made a breakthrough discovery – “2044” – stenciled in black paint on the side of one of the massive thrust chambers. 2044 is the Rocketdyne serial number that correlates to NASA number 6044, which is the serial number for F-1 Engine #5 from Apollo 11. The intrepid conservator kept digging for more evidence, and after removing more corrosion at the base of the same thrust chamber, he found it – “Unit No 2044″ – stamped into the metal surface.

44 years ago tomorrow Neil Armstrong stepped onto the moon, and now we have recovered a critical technological marvel that made it all possible. Huge kudos to the conservation team at the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas. Conservation is painstaking work that requires remarkable levels of patience and attention to detail, and these guys have both.[/quote]

After their restoration, Jeff plans to put the engines on display,”where just maybe it will inspire something amazing.”

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About The Author
AstroAggregator
My name's Chris Pounds. I started Astronomy Aggregator in 2012 as a hobby site for my interests in spaceflight and astronomy. I'm finishing up an MSc. in Aerospace Engineering. My undergraduate degree was in Mechanical Engineering with a final year dissertation focussed on performance characteristics of aerospike rocket nozzles.

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